Bottle

DATE:
c. 1650–1700
MATERIAL AND TECHNIQUE:
Non-lead glass, pewter
CLASSIFICATION:
Containers
DIMENSIONS:
8 5/8 × 4 × 4 in. (21.91 × 10.16 × 10.16 cm)
DEPARTMENT:
Decorative Arts and Design
LOCATION:
Wendy and Emery Reves Collection - Library, Level 3
CREDIT LINE:
Dallas Museum of Art, The Wendy and Emery Reves Collection
COPYRIGHT:
Image courtesy Dallas Museum of Art
OBJECT NUMBER:
1985.R.169.A-B

General Description

Venice supported glass furnaces as early as the 11th century. By the 13th century, they had grown so numerous that city officials became concerned about possible fires and restricted glass-making to the island of Murano, where it still resides. During the ensuing centuries, Venice's artisans excelled so in both design and technique that their wares were exported throughout Europe. Until at least the 17th century, Venice was unrivaled as Europe's foremost producer of fine tablewares.

Venetian glass is exceptionally diverse. From an early date, workers there produced both clear and colored glass. This bottle is a fine example of chalcedony, or calcedonio, glass. Like much of Venice's colored glass, this type imitated a semiprecious stone. Gemstones and rock crystal were highly prized materials, and therefore glass that imitated them was also coveted. Chalcedony glass was first made in Venice in the late 15th century. However, its popularity continued during the next 200 years. In fact, it was exported to such an extent throughout Europe that flasks of this type were thought to have been made in France and Germany when they were actually Venetian imports.

Excerpt from

Dallas Museum of Art, Decorative Arts Highlights from the Wendy and Emery Reves Collection (Dallas, Texas: Dallas Museum of Art, 1995), 74.