Side chair

DATE:
1735–1760
MATERIAL AND TECHNIQUE:
Maple and rush
CLASSIFICATION:
Furnishings
DIMENSIONS:
Overall: 41 3/8 x 18 1/4 x 16 3/4 in. (105.08 x 46.35 x 42.54 cm.)
DEPARTMENT:
Decorative Arts and Design
LOCATION:
American Art - 18th Century, Level 4
CREDIT LINE:
Dallas Museum of Art, The Faith P. and Charles L. Bybee Collection, gift of Faith P. Bybee
COPYRIGHT:
Image courtesy Dallas Museum of Art.
OBJECT NUMBER:
1988.B.69

General Description

Made of maple with a heavy ball stretcher in front, rush seat, and a careful gradation of back slats, this side chair is a particularly well-preserved example of a popular type. Because of its well-liked style, relative comfort, and affordability, chairs such as these were made well into the early years of the 20th century and can be found in a number of collections, both public and private. Centers of production included the Delaware River Valley of Philadelphia and South Jersey, but this type of chair shows a strong European influence as well. By grafting the ball-and-ring stretcher of fashionable New England chairs onto a local tradition of Germanic slat-back chairs, Philadelphia chairmakers were able to more effectively compete in the marketplace.


Heather Bowling, Digital Collections Content Coordinator, 2016.

Drawn from

  • Mabel Crispin Powers, "The Ware Chairs of South Jersey," Antiques, Volume 9 (May 1926): 307-311.

  • Richard H. Randall, Jr., American Furniture in the Museum of Fine Arts Boston, Boston: Museum of Fine Arts, 1965, 178-79.