Woman's sarong (lau)

DATE:
late 19th–early 20th century
MATERIAL AND TECHNIQUE:
Homespun cotton and beads
CLASSIFICATION:
Textiles
DIMENSIONS:
55 1/2 × 23 3/4 in. (140.97 × 60.33 cm)
DEPARTMENT:
Arts of the Pacific Islands
LOCATION:
Arts of the Pacific Islands - Indonesia and Papua New Guinea, Level 3
CREDIT LINE:
Dallas Museum of Art, the Steven G. Alpert Collection of Indonesian Textiles, gift of The Eugene McDermott Foundation
OBJECT NUMBER:
1983.95

General Description

Only the lower portions of this textile were visible when it was worn by a noblewoman on important ceremonial occasions. Divided into two parts separated by a wide fringed band, the weaver—also a woman of the nobility—employed different techniques to realize the design. The two rows of geometric motifs were achieved by supplementary warp weaving, a technique in which additional yarns are woven over the background. The figurative motif was created by ikat dyeing, which involves resist dyeing yarns before weaving. The latter features two monumental female figures with their arms raised and scorpions beneath their genitalia. Alternating with these figures are three smaller figures and star-shaped forms. The contrasting techniques produce a powerful visual effect.

Excerpt from

Roslyn A. Walker, Label text, 2016.