Shroud or ceremonial hanging (Papori to Noling)

DATE:
19th century
MATERIAL AND TECHNIQUE:
Homespun cotton
CLASSIFICATION:
Textiles
DIMENSIONS:
65 × 48 1/2 in. (1 m 65.1 cm × 123.19 cm)
DEPARTMENT:
Arts of the Pacific Islands
LOCATION:
Not On View
CREDIT LINE:
Dallas Museum of Art, the Steven G. Alpert Collection of Indonesian Textiles, gift of The Eugene McDermott Foundation
OBJECT NUMBER:
1983.125

General Description

The intensity of this blanket is a result of its deeply dyed colors and densely packed geometric designs. It is made up of horizontal bands that are reminiscent of ceremonial line dancing performed by women, and are similar to repetitive motifs that are found on prehistoric pottery in Kalumpang. The meaning of the overall design is now lost; however, cross-shaped pa’doti are repeatedly employed as symbols that fix time and space while beseeching blessings and continued prosperity from both the ancestors and the deities.

This type of blanket (Papori to Noling) was either used as a shroud or kept as a ceremonial heirloom textile. It is a singular example of the genre. Many, if not most, heirloom examples of Papori to Noling, “the ikat of the Noling people,” were destroyed during a civil war in the 1950s.

Excerpt from

Roslyn A. Walker, Label text, 2013.