Lacquered wood saddle

DATE:
17th century
MATERIAL AND TECHNIQUE:
Lacquered wood, gold dust (maki-e), mother-of-pearl, lead
CLASSIFICATION:
Tools and Equipment
DIMENSIONS:
Overall: 10 1/2 x 16 1/2 x 14 1/2 in. (26.67 x 41.91 x 36.83 cm)
DEPARTMENT:
Arts of Asia
LOCATION:
Not On View
CREDIT LINE:
Dallas Museum of Art, gift of The Boeckman-Mayer Fund, Foundation for the Arts Collection
COPYRIGHT:
Image courtesy Dallas Museum of Art
OBJECT NUMBER:
1991.2.FA

General Description

The making of high-quality objects in the difficult lacquer technique can take months to years to complete. Raw lacquer is thinly applied to a prepared surface and hardens in an atmosphere of high humidity. Once it has set, the lacquer must be polished, usually with water and pieces of soft stone or charcoal. Layer upon layer is applied until the proper surface has been created. The decorative technique on this magnificent ceremonial saddle is a traditional Japanese method called maki-e, meaning "sprinkled design." The composition was first drawn in moist lacquer, then metal powders or flakes were sprinkled over the drawing before the surface hardened. To achieve different tones and textures in the decoration, the artist varied the kinds of powder or flakes he applied. The saddle consists of four pieces of lacquered wood tied together. It was probably created as a presentation piece and not intended for use. The primary decoration is a pattern of small brocade bags with drawstring tops, the elegant fukuro that are used to hold containers of powdered tea for the tea ceremony. The textile patterns of the bags, created with inlays of gold and silver sheet metal and mother-of-pearl, exhibit a variety of geometric and floral patterns that were typical of the rich textiles made during the late Momoyama and early Edo periods. "Dallas Museum of Art: A Guide to the Collection," page 44

Related Multimedia

Translating Culture II is a collaborative project between the DMA, MAP - Make Art with Purpose, and Architecture Cluster students from Dallas ISD's Skyline High School. The group met over the course of two months, finding inspiration through the exploration of the DMA's collection and working in small teams to create personal interpretations, creative responses, and contextual information.
Translating Culture II is a collaborative project between the DMA, MAP - Make Art with Purpose, and Architecture Cluster students from Dallas ISD's Skyline High School. The group met over the course of two months, finding inspiration through the exploration of the DMA's collection and working in small teams to create personal interpretations, creative responses, and contextual information.
Translating Culture II is a collaborative project between the DMA, MAP - Make Art with Purpose, and Architecture Cluster students from Dallas ISD's Skyline High School. The group met over the course of two months, finding inspiration through the exploration of the DMA's collection and working in small teams to create personal interpretations, creative responses, and contextual information.
Translating Culture II is a collaborative project between the DMA, MAP - Make Art with Purpose, and Architecture Cluster students from Dallas ISD's Skyline High School. The group met over the course of two months, finding inspiration through the exploration of the DMA's collection and working in small teams to create personal interpretations, creative responses, and contextual information.
Translating Culture II is a collaborative project between the DMA, MAP - Make Art with Purpose, and Architecture Cluster students from Dallas ISD's Skyline High School. The group met over the course of two months, finding inspiration through the exploration of the DMA's collection and working in small teams to create personal interpretations, creative responses, and contextual information.
Translating Culture II is a collaborative project between the DMA, MAP - Make Art with Purpose, and Architecture Cluster students from Dallas ISD's Skyline High School. The group met over the course of two months, finding inspiration through the exploration of the DMA's collection and working in small teams to create personal interpretations, creative responses, and contextual information.