Dish

DATE:
c. 1660–1675
MATERIAL AND TECHNIQUE:
Porcelain, enameled
CLASSIFICATION:
Containers
DIMENSIONS:
2 1/2 × 13 1/8 × 13 1/8 in. (6.35 × 33.34 × 33.34 cm)
DEPARTMENT:
Decorative Arts and Design
LOCATION:
Wendy and Emery Reves Collection - Great Hall, Level 3
CREDIT LINE:
Dallas Museum of Art, The Wendy and Emery Reves Collection
OBJECT NUMBER:
1985.R.858

General Description

Following the fall of the Ming dynasty, during which porcelain decorated in underglaze blue dominated, Chinese potters introduced a wide range of overglaze enamel colors, producing beautiful polychrome wares. Such ware is called Kangxi porcelain since it was for the most part made during that emperor's reign (1662-1722). Evidently, little of this new multicolored pottery was sent abroad during the first part of the new reign. In 1662, the Chinese retook the trading center of Formosa from the Dutch, making it more difficult for Europeans to trade. Furthermore, the kilns at Jingdezhen were destroyed by internal violence in 1673 and not rebuilt until 1682. However, once production was revived, large quantities of Kangxi porcelain were exported to Europe, the Middle East, and the Americas.

This dish, and another closely related example in the Reves collection (see 1985.R.859), has a double foot rim that was in use between the late 1650s and early 1670s.

Adapted from

Dallas Museum of Art, Decorative Arts Highlights from the Wendy and Emery Reves Collection (Dallas, Texas: Dallas Museum of Art, 1995), 93.

Web Resources

The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Read more about Chinese Export Porcelain