Figure of an atlant

DATE:
3rd–4th century CE
MATERIAL AND TECHNIQUE:
Schist
CLASSIFICATION:
Sculpture
DIMENSIONS:
Overall: 6 3/4 x 5 1/2 x 3 1/2in. (17.2 x 14 x 8.9cm.)
DEPARTMENT:
Arts of Asia
LOCATION:
306 HINDU GALLERY
CREDIT LINE:
Dallas Museum of Art, gift of Alta Brenner in memory of her daughter Andrea Bernice Brenner-McMullen
OBJECT NUMBER:
1992.40

General Description

This figure is an architectural support in the form of a winged strong man called an "atlant." The term atlant refers to any carved stone architectural support in the form of a muscular, robust male figure. The atlant (plural: atlantes) is named after the Greek god Atlas, who holds the sky up with his arms, head, and shoulders. The atlant motif originated in ancient India, Greece, and the Near East. In the art and architecture of Gandhara, atlantes are male figures of great strength whose arms are occasionally supplemented with wings.

Excerpt from

Robert Warren Clark, "Figure of an atlant," in The Arts of India, South East Asia, and the Himalayas, Anne R. Bromberg (Dallas: Dallas Museum of Art; New Haven: Yale University Press, 2013), 43.