Bowl

DATE:
c. 16th–18th century
MATERIAL AND TECHNIQUE:
Glazed ceramic
CLASSIFICATION:
Containers
DIMENSIONS:
Diameter: 11 7/8 in. (30.16 cm) Depth: 2 3/8 in. (6.03 cm)
DEPARTMENT:
Arts of Asia
LOCATION:
303 ISLAMIC GALLERY
CREDIT LINE:
Dallas Museum of Art, bequest of Sarah Dorsey Brown Hudson
OBJECT NUMBER:
1996.82

General Description

This Turkish bowl is an example of the kind of wares produced and subsidized by the Ottoman court, initially at Iznik in western Anatolia and later at a town known as Kutahya. Iznik ware, as this type of porcelain is known, was originally inspired by the shapes and colors of Chinese porcelains. This blue-and-white plate reflects the Ottoman love for Chinese ceramics in its shape, floral motifs, and colors.

The production of vessels for practical use and for display is reflected in this bowl. But much of the huge Iznik ceramic industry was also coupled with the Ottoman's monumental building program. Ceramic tiles produced in Iznik were used as wall decoration on the enormous royal mosques and palaces of Istanbul and in other important cities. This meant tremendous sums of money were poured into tile production at least through the mid-17th century, when quality and technical excellence remained extremely high.

Adapted from

  • Catherine Asher, "Plate", in The Arts of India, South East Asia, and the Himalayas, Anne R. Bromberg (Dallas: Dallas Museum of Art; New Haven: Yale University Press, 2013), 149.

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