Charger

DATE:
c. 1740–1750
MATERIAL AND TECHNIQUE:
Enameled porcelain
CLASSIFICATION:
Containers
DIMENSIONS:
Overall: 1 7/8 x 15 1/4 in. (4.76 x 38.74 cm)
DEPARTMENT:
Decorative Arts and Design
LOCATION:
Wendy and Emery Reves Collection - Porcelain , Level 3
CREDIT LINE:
Dallas Museum of Art, The Wendy and Emery Reves Collection
COPYRIGHT:
Image courtesy Dallas Museum of Art.
OBJECT NUMBER:
1985.R.853

General Description

This large plate depicts the harbor of a great fortified city. Despite the presence of some European-style architecture and figures at front left, the view is probably meant to represent an Islamic trading center with its many domes and minarets. The trade theme is further emphasized by the four border reserves within feathery cartouches on the plate's rim, each of which depicts figures in discussion on a riverbank outside the city walls. For both Europeans and Chinese, the Near East was an important trading partner. For example, much Chinese export porcelain was sold there. The predominantly orange, or iron-red, palette is varied with rose, yellow, and translucent green, and, for the sky and water, a delicate blue.

At present, no other plate like this one has been located, although the scrollwork used here between and around the scenes is known on other pieces. Such details were initially used at the Meissen factory in Germany during the 1730s. When Europeans sent this porcelain to Asia for copying, the Chinese adapted the scrollwork and incorporated it into many of their mid-18th century pieces.

Adapted from

  • Dallas Museum of Art, Decorative Arts Highlights from the Wendy and Emery Reves Collection (Dallas, Texas: Dallas Museum of Art, 1995), 106.

  • Dallas Museum of Art, The Wendy and Emery Reves Collection (Dallas, Texas: Dallas Museum of Art, 1985), 197.

Web Resources

The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Read more about Chinese Export Porcelain