Bedding cover (futonji) with fans and flowers

DATE:
Late 19th–early 20th century
MATERIAL AND TECHNIQUE:
cotton, resist-dyed (tsutsugaki)
CLASSIFICATION:
Textiles
DIMENSIONS:
60 3/4 × 53 in. (1 m 54.31 cm × 134.62 cm)
DEPARTMENT:
Arts of Asia
LOCATION:
Not On View
CREDIT LINE:
Dallas Museum of Art, gift of Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Bloom
OBJECT NUMBER:
1986.49

General Description

The folding fan (ogi) appears frequently on Japanese textiles, as a simplified form scattered across the surface of a Noh robe or as the nucleus of a design, as on this bedding cover. Painted with stylized landscapes in typical colors of blue, gray, gray-green, orange, and brown, two fans have elaborately garlanded handles whose flowing lines repeat the graceful curves of the orange, tasseled cords behind them. Blue-leaved peonies complete the composition with an auspicious symbol.

As on other futonji, the designs are outlined in white against dark blue. Drawn with paste held by a metal-tipped tube (tsutsu), the white outlining represents the original, undyed color of the cloth, which protected by the layer of paste, resisted the indigo dye into which the textile was dipped. Because the indigo did not dissolve the paste, dark blue became the standard ground color for these textiles.

Excerpt from

  • Carol Robbins, DMA unpublished material, 1986.