Mantle or carrying cloth (awayo)

DATE:
20th century
MATERIAL AND TECHNIQUE:
Sheep wool
CLASSIFICATION:
Textiles
DIMENSIONS:
38 × 42 in. (96.52 × 106.68 cm)
DEPARTMENT:
Latin American Art
LOCATION:
Not On View
CREDIT LINE:
Dallas Museum of Art, gift of Sarah Dorsey Hudson
COPYRIGHT:
Image courtesy Dallas Museum of Art
OBJECT NUMBER:
1991.373

General Description

Weaving remains a specialized art in the Andes, with the continued production of vibrant patterned ponchos, mantles, carrying cloths, and hats, as well as slings and coca bags (chuspa). Arguably the garment type least affected by the Spanish Colonial dress codes, the mantle, or lliclla, continues to be worn by Andean women. Mantles are wrapped around the shoulders, generally with the stripes horizontal. They are fastened together at the front with pins, or tupu, that have acquired different shapes and elaborations through time. This mantle represents a simple but standard type from the Macha regions in southwestern Bolivia with colorful spotted chevrons that extend along the central bands.

Excerpt from

Kimberly L. Jones, PhD, Inca: Conquests of the Andes / Los Incas y las conquistas de los Andes, Label text, 2015.