Plate

DATE:
c. 1755
MATERIAL AND TECHNIQUE:
Salt-glazed stoneware
CLASSIFICATION:
Containers
DIMENSIONS:
1 1/2 × 10 3/8 × 10 3/8 in. (3.81 × 26.35 × 26.35 cm)
DEPARTMENT:
Decorative Arts and Design
LOCATION:
European Decorative Arts and Design, Level 3
CREDIT LINE:
Dallas Museum of Art, Gift of Anne J. Stewart
OBJECT NUMBER:
1989.137

General Description

During the early 18th century, English potters adopted the old German technique of throwing salt into the kiln when it was hot. The salt vaporized, leaving a clear matte glaze, as seen on this dish. The white color is actually that of the stoneware clay, which produces a hard, non-porous body when fired and shows through the clear glaze. The introduction of stoneware, and later creamware, were great advances because plain earthenwares which preceded them absorbed liquids and bacteria into the clay body once their glaze coverings were chipped. By the 1750s, England was producing some of the finest salt-glaze ware in Europe; this particular dish is an exceptional example. Not only does it have elaborately molded rococo decoration, but it is pierced as well. Few English pieces so completely embody the fluid lines and grace of the rococo age as does this plate. Hard and durable, this English salt-glazed stoneware was used by the American colonial elite in the mid-18th century.

Adapted from

  • Charles L. Venable, Ellen P. Denker, Katherine C. Grier, Stephen G. Harrison, China and Glass in America, 1880-1980: From Tabletop to TV Tray (New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 2000), 103-104.

  • Charles Venable, DMA unpublished material, Museum of Europe Label Text, 1993.