Figure of a court lady

DATE:
206 BCE–8 CE
MATERIAL AND TECHNIQUE:
Earthenware
CLASSIFICATION:
Sculpture
DIMENSIONS:
Height: 35 1/4 in. (89.535 cm)
DEPARTMENT:
Arts of Asia
LOCATION:
Arts of Asia - China, Level 3
CREDIT LINE:
Dallas Museum of Art, anonymous gift
COPYRIGHT:
Image courtesy Dallas Museum of Art
OBJECT NUMBER:
1995.67.A-B

General Description

Women at the Chinese imperial court were highly trained not only in clothes, manners, and etiquette but also in music, dance, and other pleasing arts. They were expected to understand the arts and literature and to perform well themselves, adding to the pleasures and grace of court life. This figure of a female attendant, standing in a respectful pose, is an example of mingqi ("spirit objects") placed in the tombs of deceased royals and nobility to protect and serve them, as well as provide the pleasures they enjoyed in life.

Adapted from

  • Anne Bromberg, Label text, All the World's a Stage: Celebrating Performance in the Visual Arts, 2009.

  • "A Painted Pottery Figure of a Court Lady," description provided by J.J. Lally & Co. Oriental Art, Dallas Museum of Art Collections Records Object File.