Figure of lama

DATE:
16th century
MATERIAL AND TECHNIQUE:
Bronze
CLASSIFICATION:
Sculpture
DIMENSIONS:
9 3/4 × 6 5/8 × 5 in. (24.77 × 16.83 × 12.7 cm)
DEPARTMENT:
Arts of Asia
LOCATION:
305 BUDDHIST GALLERY
CREDIT LINE:
Dallas Museum of Art, gift of Alta Brenner in memory of her daughter Andrea Bernice Brenner-McMullen
OBJECT NUMBER:
1994.47

General Description

A lama is the chief monk at a Tibetan monastery. He was considered sacred after his death. This bronze shows a lama wearing the special hat of the Karmapa, identifying him as the head of the Karma Kagyu school of Tibetan Buddhism. He is engaged in a Tantric ritual with a vajra or thunderbolt in his right hand and a skull cap in his left. This might represent Mikyo Dorje, the Eighth Karmapa (1507-1554).

Adapted from

  • Robert Warren Clark "Figure of a lama," in The Arts of India, South East Asia, and the Himalayas, Anne R. Bromberg (Dallas: Dallas Museum of Art; New Haven: Yale University Press, 2013), 166.
  • Anne Bromberg, Label text, 2003.

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