Vishnu and attendants

DATE:
c. 1026 CE
MATERIAL AND TECHNIQUE:
Sandstone
CLASSIFICATION:
Sculpture
DIMENSIONS:
Overall: 54 x 27 x 11 in. (137.16 x 68.58 x 27.94 cm)
DEPARTMENT:
Arts of Asia
LOCATION:
306 HINDU GALLERY
CREDIT LINE:
Dallas Museum of Art, gift of Mrs. John Leddy Jones
COPYRIGHT:
Image courtesy Dallas Museum of Art
OBJECT NUMBER:
1963.29

General Description

This standing image of the god Vishnu is said to be from the Sun Temple at Modhera, constructed under the patronage of King Bhimdev I of the Solanki dynasty in 1026. Vishnu is four-armed and holds the mace, wheel, and conch shell, three of his usual four attributes. The fourth, a lotus flower, is not shown. Instead, the remain­ing hand is rendered in a gift-bestowing gesture. He is accompanied by six figures standing on the pedestal, five of them male and one female, the first two of which on either side probably personify his attributes. Kneeling on either side of Vishnu’s feet are representations of the donor couple, not identified in any inscription. Here, typical of representa­tions of Vishnu, he wears a tall crown and has a garland that extends almost to his knees.

Adapted from

Frederick M. Asher, "Vishnu and attendants," in The Arts of India, South East Asia, and the Himalayas, Anne R. Bromberg (Dallas: Dallas Museum of Art; New Have: Yale University Press, 2013), 91.