Soup Bowl (Whieldon-type)

DATE:
c. 1750–1780
MATERIAL AND TECHNIQUE:
Tortoise shell glazed creamware
CLASSIFICATION:
Containers
DIMENSIONS:
1 1/2 × 9 3/8 × 9 3/8 in. (3.81 × 23.81 × 23.81 cm)
DEPARTMENT:
Decorative Arts and Design
LOCATION:
Decorative Arts and Design Study Gallery, Level 4
CREDIT LINE:
Dallas Museum of Art, The Faith P. and Charles L. Bybee Collection, gift of Faith P. Bybee
OBJECT NUMBER:
1992.B.229

General Description

A pioneer of English pottery production, Thomas Whieldon (1719-95), is perhaps best known for producing tortoiseshell ware, a type of earthenware with variegated surface color. Tortoiseshell wares were first mentioned by Thomas Whieldon in his Account and Memorandum Book of 1749, and has long been associated with the name of Whieldon. Glazes like these were not painted on, but applied to the body in crystal form. During the firing, the crystals melted and merged into the glaze, producing the mottling. In 1754, Josiah Wedgwood entered into a partnership with Whieldon, chiefly to study glazes. In his 'Experiment Book' of 1759, Wedgwood states that tortoiseshell ware was the second most important ware at the Whieldon factory. While Whieldon oversaw pottery production in Fenton, Stoke-on-Trent, and Staffordshire, England, his stylistic influences were widespread.

Heather Bowling, Digital Collections Content Coordinator, 2017.

Drawn from

Wedgwood Museum, "Thomas Whieldon," http://www.wedgwoodmuseum.org.uk/learning/discovery_packs/pack/working-at-wedgwood/chapter/thomas-whieldon-1719-95, Accessed February 28, 2017.