Footed salver

DATE:
17th century
MATERIAL AND TECHNIQUE:
Non-lead glass
CLASSIFICATION:
Containers
DIMENSIONS:
3 5/8 × 8 1/2 × 8 1/8 in. (9.21 × 21.59 × 20.64 cm)
DEPARTMENT:
Decorative Arts and Design
LOCATION:
Wendy and Emery Reves Collection - Library, Level 3
CREDIT LINE:
Dallas Museum of Art, The Wendy and Emery Reves Collection
COPYRIGHT:
Image courtesy Dallas Museum of Art
OBJECT NUMBER:
1985.R.194

General Description

This footed salver was produced in large numbers by Venetian glasshouses, and the striped decoration on the top surface is characteristic of Venetian work. This type of ornament is known as verto a retorti or "glass with twists." Developed during the Renaissance, the style remained popular through the 18th century, It is made by applying glass canes with opaque glass twists to the clear glass. As the hot glass is worked, the round canes are flattened into the surface to form the pattern. In this example, canes of solid color were also used to achieve a pattern of alternating stripes.

While footed salvers were used to hold food of various kinds, they could also be used to elevate other vessels too. For example, they are known to have held sets of glasses.

Adapted from

Dallas Museum of Art, Decorative Arts Highlights from the Wendy and Emery Reves Collection (Dallas, Texas: Dallas Museum of Art, 1995), 75.