Painted tunic: stepped yoke and bird waistband

DATE:
1440–1540
MATERIAL AND TECHNIQUE:
Cotton
CLASSIFICATION:
Textiles
DIMENSIONS:
64 1/2 × 30 1/2 in. (1 m 63.83 cm × 77.47 cm)
DEPARTMENT:
Arts of the Americas
LOCATION:
Not On View
CREDIT LINE:
Dallas Museum of Art, gift of Silas R. Mountsier III from the collection of Nora E. H. Wise and in her honor
OBJECT NUMBER:
1994.281

General Description

Painted textiles on the Andean coast date from at least the Early Horizon (900-200 BCE) and the discovery of preserved examples at Carhua (Karwa) on the Peruvian southern coast. Succeeding coastal populations continued to produce elaborate painted textiles, utilizing a range of plant dyes and mineral pigments on plain weave cotton fabric. In comparison to elaborate figurative scenes painted on architectural hangings, this bi-chrome tunic reflects Late Horizon (1400-1532 CE) stylistic trends through the painting of a stepped yoke. The repeated seabirds around the neck and across the base of this tunic suggest a coastal connection to the sea.

Adapted from

Kimberly L. Jones, PhD, Inca: Conquests of the Andes / Los Incas y las conquistas de los Andes, Label text, 2015.