Initiation crown

DATE:
16th–19th century
MATERIAL AND TECHNIQUE:
Gold, leather, and paint
CLASSIFICATION:
Costume
DIMENSIONS:
Overall: 6 3/4 x 4 1/2 in. (17.15 x 11.43 cm.)
DEPARTMENT:
Arts of Asia
LOCATION:
304 SNAIL GALLERY
CREDIT LINE:
Dallas Museum of Art, gift of David T. Owsley via the Alconda-Owsley Foundation
OBJECT NUMBER:
2000.407

General Description

Crowns or headdresses, like this example, are used in Tibetan Buddhist rituals. They are worn by young men during initiation ceremonies when they are accepted as monks in a Tibetan monastery, or during ritual chanting or monastic ritual dances. The crown has five Buddha figures, representing the teaching of meditation practices. Each of the figures has achieved enlightenment (passing beyond the wheel of life, death, and rebirth) but still helps people in understanding the teachings of the Buddha.

Adapted from

  • Label text, Anne Bromberg, 2006.

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