Green Tara

DATE:
18th century
MATERIAL AND TECHNIQUE:
Gilt copper alloy and turquoise
CLASSIFICATION:
Sculpture
DIMENSIONS:
14 1/2 × 10 × 6 1/2 in. (36.83 × 25.4 × 16.51 cm)
DEPARTMENT:
Arts of Asia
LOCATION:
305 BUDDHIST GALLERY
CREDIT LINE:
Dallas Museum of Art, the Cecil and Ida Green Acquisition Fund
COPYRIGHT:
Image courtesy Dallas Museum of Art.
OBJECT NUMBER:
2005.28

General Description

Tara is probably the most widely wor­shipped of all the female deities in the Buddhist pantheon. She is described by the First Dalai Lama, Gyalwa Gendun Drubpa (1391–1474) as “the wisdom, loving compassion, and enlightened activities of all the buddhas arising in the form of a divinely beautiful goddess.” She appears in this 18th-century Tibetan bronze in one of her most popular iconographic forms. With one face and two arms, she sits on her lotus throne with her right leg stretched forward in lalitasana, indi­cating that she is always rising from her meditations and going forth to assist living beings.

Excerpt from

R. W. Clark, "Green Tara," in The Arts of India, South East Asia, and the Himalayas, Anne R. Bromberg (Dallas: Dallas Museum of Art; New Haven: Yale University Press, 2013), 170.