Llama head whistle

DATE:
750 –1500 CE
MATERIAL AND TECHNIQUE:
Ceramic and slip paints
CLASSIFICATION:
Sound devices
DIMENSIONS:
Overall: 2 3/4 x 5 x 5 3/4 in. (6.985 x 12.7 x 14.605 cm)
DEPARTMENT:
Arts of the Americas
LOCATION:
Not On View
CREDIT LINE:
Dallas Museum of Art, gift of Sally R. and William C. Estes in honor of Carol Robbins' 40th anniversary at the Dallas Museum of Art
COPYRIGHT:
This work is in the public domain. Image courtesy Dallas Museum of Art.
OBJECT NUMBER:
2005.32

General Description

This modeled camelid head, with holes in the head and lip, may once have served as a whistle or paccha. This vessel reflects the use of vibrant polychrome slip paints developed on the south coast as well as aspects of elite feasting in its representation of prized camelid meat.

Adapted from

Kimberly L. Jones, PhD, Inca: Conquests of the Andes / Los Incas y las conquistas de los Andes, Label text [1984.W.219; 1997.120; 2005.32], 2015.

Fun Facts

  • The vessel may have once served as a whistle or a paccha, or ceremonial vessel used for pouring liquids such as corn (maize) beer, called chicha in Spanish or Taino, or aqha (a’qa) in Quechua.

Web Resources

The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Read more about Music in the Andes.