Coat (chapan)

DATE:
early 20th century
MATERIAL AND TECHNIQUE:
Silk and cotton
CLASSIFICATION:
Textiles
DIMENSIONS:
49 1/2 × 56 3/4 in. (125.73 × 144.15 cm)
DEPARTMENT:
Arts of Asia
LOCATION:
Not On View
CREDIT LINE:
Dallas Museum of Art, gift of Sally R. and William C. Estes
COPYRIGHT:
Image courtesy Dallas Museum of Art.
OBJECT NUMBER:
2005.70

General Description

The textiles of Uzbekistan in Central Asia are often designed with dazzling and forceful patterns in bright colors. The flamboyance of these works is often close to the dynamic red and gold garments of India, with their brilliant multicolored designs. Here, the red, maroon, teal, and yellow shapes were created with ikat weaving, the method of using resist-dyed threads in textiles. In Uzbekistan, the popular ikat-covered fabrics were called abr, or "clouds" because of the way one motif faded into another across the garment. The dynamic composition and glowing effect of this silk coat required a collaborative effort with as many as eight specialist dyers and weavers. Worn on everyday and ceremonial occasions, the coat, with its wide sleeves and broad cut, was often worn in layers, with the newest and most luxurious coat on top.

The formation of Soviet Uzbekistan in 1924 caused a great decline in the production of true ikat silk fabrics; however, their colorful and blurred patterns were so popular that many less expensive fabrics have been printed with ikat motifs.

Adapted from

  • Carol Robbins, Label text, 2008.

  • Label text, 2018.

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