Qatar (dagger)

DATE:
17th century
MATERIAL AND TECHNIQUE:
Inlaid, engraved, and gilded steel
CLASSIFICATION:
Weapons and ammunition
DIMENSIONS:
Overall: 16 1/2 x 3 1/2 x 5/8 in. (41.91 x 8.89 x 1.59 cm)
DEPARTMENT:
Arts of Asia
LOCATION:
303 ISLAMIC GALLERY
CREDIT LINE:
Dallas Museum of Art, gift of David T. Owsley via the Alconda-Owsley Foundation
OBJECT NUMBER:
2009.15.1

General Description

The qatar, a two-handled dagger used for stabbing with force, is often illustrated in Indian miniature paintings as part of the typical attire of warriors and rulers. This example is especially elegant, enriched by the image of elephants in combat on the blade. The blade is reinforced with a strong inset. The techniques of gilding, inlaying, and chasing metal reached a high point during the Mughal period, when such implements were as much signs of status as actual weapons.

Excerpt from

Anne Bromberg, "Qatar (dagger)" in The Arts of India, South East Asia, and the Himalayas__ (Dallas: Dallas Museum of Art; New Haven: Yale University Press, 2013), 147.